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20130201
20130209
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KQED (PBS) 26
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
of gasoline comes as workers have less take-home pay, because of the expiration of a payroll tax holiday. so will consumers be forced to cut back spending, hurting economic growth, and stock market performance? >> not necessarily, because rising gasoline prices is usually predicated on a weaker dollar or better economic activity. better economic activity would lead to higher earnings. >> reporter: wolfberg says crude prices would have to jump $10 a barrel, or roughly 10%, before there's a major hit to the u.s. economy. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still ahead, the federal reserve is the latest target of a cyber attack, are companies taking cyber risks seriously? >> susie: on wall street today, a choppy day of trading with investors focused on new concerns about the outlook for europe's economy, and a new batch of corporate earnings. with more than half of the companies in the s&p reporting, quarterly results have been better than expected. still, by the closing bell, stocks were virtually unchanged. the dow rose seven points, the nasdaq fell three, and the s&p added nearly a poi
their payroll tax cut. >> declined december to january. >> they want the payroll tax cut, no wonder. >> the big picture job numbers that came out try were encouraging but even business experts were looking at the big picture and seeing the economy in job growth has been sluggish and terribly sluggish for a really long time. still hovering around 8% up employment. when is this going to end? no one sees it ending soon. that is bad news overall. >>> what do you think mort? >> i think the she remains weak -- economy remains weak. as pat was saying. $25 billion a week in terms of deficit spending trying to boost up the economy. secondly, $85 billion a month, coming out of the federal reserve, the loosest monetary policy we have ever had. we can barely get the economy to grow. it was 2.4% last year, then 1.8%, if that, maybe even less this year. despite all the stimulus. so the economy is continuing slow, it is not even staying flat. >> so you are saying we are in for several quarters of low growth? >> we hope it is going to be several quarters of low growth. anything can happen in an economy this fr
in large part on decisions made in washington in the next two months on spending and taxes. white house economic adviser alan krueger warns the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester could hurt the economy and job growth. washington bureau chief darren gersh spoke with him at the white house just after the employment report came out. darren began by asking there's a clear trend in the jobs numbers. >> today's report of 157,000 was a little bit above what the average has been for the previous 12 months, but i think if you look at the whole pattern, we see a job market that's gradually healing. over the last 35 months, our businesses have add 6.1 million jobs. that's moving in the right direction but we have a big hole to dig our way out of because the financial crisis was so deep >> darren: it doesn't look like in the job numbers that the fiscal cliff scared employers from hiring people but that didn't show up. were you surprise bide that? >> i think our economy has been resilient. investment was strong in the fourth quarter, particularly in equipment and software. we're seeing s
for the 4% to pull along the 96%. but the consumer is doing okay. >> charlie: do you think taxes impact the way business makes a decision about inconvenien inin, about hiring, about expanding factories, that kind of thing. >> sure they do. charlie: significant or is it simply depending on demand? >> i would say first of all if you compare taxes to your ability to sell the product, it's no contest. it's not even close. you may remember... >> charlie: the product. ... is the thing that runs the show. exactly. if your tax goes up a little bit but your ability to sell the product at the same time doubles or triples, you're really going to notice the taxes. you're going full throttle. if you can't sell it, it doesn't much matter if the government is giving you tax breaks. >> charlie: some people have since the crash in 2008, you know, have said, well, businesses uncertain about the future. >> you hear this constantly. charlie: i'll mention regulations. they'll mention the economic picture. or they'll mention the fact that they develop certain efficiencies. >> sure. they're trying. but what i
it to him. >> john mccain is not the issue, it is chuck hagel. his problem is not some tax, it is knowledge, elementary knowledge. he spoke about the government of iran as illegitimate the elected government. we know that the revolution of 2009 was part by the fact that it was a rigged election, an illegitimate economy. the clip i wanted you to show was the one in which he said, he was asked about the policy of containment. it was not a bad during issue. he says, yes, i support the administration's policy of containment. he then gets a note that says, i have been told that i made a mistake. of course i am not in support of that. a policy of this administration on containment is that it does not have a policy of containment. at which point democratic senator levin had to rescue him and said, in fact, the administration has a policy of containment, and it is to oppose it. he was clueless. >> colby? >> he was in the position where he had to dodge a little bit. let's go back to the exchange with senator mccain on the surge. the issue was never the surge when you talk about iraq. the issue, as s
damaged out kind of costs -- damaged al qaeda possibility to plan a tax, but others say they alienate local populations. brennan will have to answer questions in his confirmation hearing as cia director. the legality of drone strikes is likely to be high on the agenda, especially after a memo was leaked. white house 3 did the white house defended the policy. >> we have a knowledge there are sometimes we use remotely piloted aircraft against terrorists and to prevent attacks on the united states and to save american lives. we conduct the strikes because they are necessary to prevent threats, to stop future attacks, and save american lives. these attacks are ethical and wires. >> the fact there is a secret base may mean some of the difficult questions may be raised not just in washington but in saudi arabia's capital, riyadh. >> today the royal bank of scotland became the third major bank to pay for its part in bringing a key global interest rate now in libor. they have been forced to turn over more than $6 million. the incident gives another black guy to the already brews the baking in
much too fast? >> so the answer should be another stimulus package, tax cuts, more government spending? >> there are people who argue that. gwen: there's no political appetite for it. >> it is not going to happen. what kruger is talking about, the president's economist is let's not cuts too fast. the only way we could get anything that resembles stimulus if we got a long-term spending thing but that looks unlikely. >> there was criticism by the republicans this week over the white house's decision to disband -- disband the president's jobs council. what was this and what difference does it make? >> i don't think it makes any difference at all. i love republicans criticizing the president for disbanding something they said didn't do anything in the first place. it seemed like it was an act of political theater that had run its course. the president hadn't met with them over a year. it never had any purpose other than p.r. gwen: now just another blue ribbon commission. >> even worse. >> there was a lot of talk on capitol hill this week about the upcoming budgets cuts and whether or not t
, the president urged congress to pass a mix of spending cuts and tax increases to ease the immediate hit. >> there is no reason that the jobs of thousands of americans who work in national security or education or clean energy, not to mention the growth of the entire economy, should be put in jeopardy just because folks in washington couldn't come together to eliminate a few special interest tax loopholes. >> reporter: republicans dismissed the calls for more tax increases, and many argue the threat of the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester are the only way to force democrats to accept more spending cuts. but their leverage may be limited. >> i think we will have the sequester for a short period of time, probably until the first civilian employee of the government is furloughed, which might take about a week. and then, that pain may be enough to cause the people on capitol hill and the president to come to some sort of rational deal. >> reporter: the short-term budget fight comes as the medium-term outlook for federal red ink is improving. the congressional budget office figu
. americans are paying more for gasoline. and many families are now feeling the pain of higher payroll taxes. >> reporter: and many families may be making fewer trips to the mall because of other spending priorities: >> automobile sales have been coming back now for a full year. that is cannibalizing some of the discretionary spending power out of all the other categories, whether it's apparel, sporting goods, etcetera. >> reporter: johnson predicts retail sales overall will rise 2.9% this year. that's less optimistic than the national retail federation's 3.4% forecast. >> income growth is still very sluggish. and of course we have the uncertainty from the sequester and all the washington nonsense occurring. so we think we would do very well to get near to a 3% annual growth rate. >> reporter: going forward, it will be harder to identify retail sales trends month-to- month. four major chain stores; target, macys, kohl's, and nordstrom, will no longer provide monthly same-store sales figures. they join others like wal-mart and sears that only report sales quarterly. >> in some ways it makes i
billion. it was $1.1 trillion last year. the c.b.o. attributed the decline in part to new tax hikes and to automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect in march. but it said those same factors may also hold back economic growth. personal computer maker dell has announced it's going private. the company detailed a $24 billion buyout of stockholders today. it's the largest deal of its kind since the great recession. dell has been publicly traded for nearly 25 years. but sales have waned as consumers have shifted towards smartphones and tablets. britain took a major step today toward legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide. the house of commons voted more than 2-1 to legalize the practice. that's despite sharp divisions in the ruling conservative party. prime minister david cameron acknowledged the split, but supported the bill. >> i think it's delight gay people should be able to get married, too. this is yes about equality but it's also about making our society stronger. i know there are strong views on both sides of the aisle, i respect that, but i think this is an important ste
say the postal service, who takes no money now-- we get no tax money-- shouldn't get a tax bailout and should live within their means, meaning if twee need to eliminate delivery on saturday we do. now, our proposal is to eliminate delivery of mail but to continue to deliver packages, which includes medicine for the elderly and handicapped and the rural areas. and that's what our customers have told us. last year we made some changes. post offices. we talked about having to close small, nonprofitable postal offices. we spent a lot of time in the field and herd back from crust mers. they said we don't care if you shrink the opening, just keep the it open. here's the problem we're facing, jeff reerk no matter what anybody thinks on this-- people pay bills online. in the year 2003, we delivered 51 billion-- with a "b--" pieces of stamped mail out of the mailbox. this year it will be 21 billion. 30 billion pieces in less than 10 years at 46 cents apiece say differential in that group of $14 billion. nobody is stepping up saying i'll take a pay cut that makes those kinds of differences u
iii, i think it will have a very different assessment of the tax. >> the grave has already given up many secrets. we know that he was wounded in battle 10 times. preparations are being made to inter the remains of richard iii in a cathedral here next year. >> he worked -- whether he was a villain or not, he still ended up buried in a car park. continue watching bbc world news for updates on our stories around the world on our 24-hour news network. check your local listings. thanks so much for watching. we will see back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key, strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. picking da
inheritance tax on the wealthiest one tenth of 1 percent than it is to address the millions of unemployed who have needs that are not being met. and of course you could pair this-- (applause) >> in different ways. we really have to take stock of the fact we're not doing justice by our education system, by our infrastructure, by our research and development, by the policies that are needed to lift up the people of this country. and no government doesn't have to do everything. of course. we understand that. but you know, the idea of declaring the wealthiest few in the country, the job creators, well, the job creators are the people who either do or do not have money to go to the stores and purchase things and to do for their families. and when they can't the economy sinks. >> rose: i want to talk about all of those, whether the digital revolution, but with washington we just had an election. >> yeah. >> rose: president obama re-elected. we see now some movement towards immigration reform. >> yeah. >> rose: because elections have results. >> yeah. >> and they realize the latino population have s
of a payroll tax holiday. 20 retailers tracked by thomson reuters reported an average sales gain of 5% in january. that's nearly twice as strong as last year. erika miller looks at whether the sales momentum can continue. >> reporter: if there's one thing helping retailers these days, it's cold weather. low temperatures in much of the nation has boosted sales of coats and warm clothing. so no surprise that department stores selling those items were big winners in january.
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)